Metabolic gene and breastfeeding unite to boost a child’s IQ

Blogging on Peer-Reviewed ResearchBreastfed babies have higher IQs if they have the ‘C’ version of the FADS2 gene.The nature-nurture debate is one of the most famous in biology, but its own nature has shifted substantially in recent years. We now know that genes and environment are not opposing agents that shape our lives separately, but partners walking hand-in-hand. More often than not, genes affect our bodies and behaviour by altering the ways in which we react to our environment.

Now, an international team of researchers have discovered a stark example of this gene-environment partnership. They found that breastfed children have higher IQ scores, but only if they have a certain version of a gene called FADS2.

The concept of IQ has been central to the nature-nurture debate for years, ever since studies in twins suggested that a large part of the variation in IQ scores could be explained through inherited genetic factors. Avshalom Caspi and Terrie Moffitt from King’s College London wanted to kill this tiresome debate finding a gene that affected IQ via the environment.

They chose to look at breastfeeding, as studies have mostly found that babies who drink their mothers’ milk have higher IQ scores, among other benefits. These higher scores persist into adulthood and across social classes. We also have a reasonable idea of how breastfeeding could affect brain development at a molecular level, and it involves fatty acids.

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